Chaplain’s Page

Please note: From now on the weekly bulletin will not be appearing on this page as it has for the past six months.  Instead you can find it on the “News” page.  This page will host occasional reflections like those below.


Reflections on a marriage

On Friday (5th October) I conducted my first wedding blessing in Italy.  The actual marriage took place in Beijing earlier in the year and the guests had come from many parts of the world.  Some had come from the western edge of the Atlantic Isles, others from the heart of the Middle Kingdom, and the rest from many different places between and beyond.  What drew them was probably the most powerful force in the universe, the force of love.

They had come to acknowledge and celebrate the love between the newly married couple, and had come because of love for them.  What drew each of them, many after long journeys, was their love for the couple, whether as family members, friends, or colleagues.  And what the couple had set at the heart of this celebration of their love was a powerful reminder that their love is a reflection of another love, the love that, in the words of the greatest of all Italian poets, “moves the sun and the other stars”.  Love is the nature of God.  Love is the power that creates the universe and sustains it in being. Love is the power which seizes and transforms human lives.

They had chosen for the reading a passage from St John’s Gospel (ch. 15: vv. 9-17) which spells it out the nature of love with an almost terrifying clarity.  The love of which Jesus speaks to his disciples, in that passage, and which lies at the heart of the universe, is not “warm fuzzies”, fluffy kittens, bluebirds, hearts and flowers.  The love of which Jesus speaks to his disciples is a love which shows itself in self-giving, self-emptying, commitment to the beloved – even to the point of death.  “Love one another” says Jesus, “as I have loved you.”  Those words are, if you think about it, frightening.  Loving as Jesus loves means setting no limits, no boundaries to our giving, our sharing of life, our readiness to forgive – and to be forgiven.  Loving as Jesus loves means being open to the world as well as open to each other. It includes all the commitments to which the partners pledge themselves at a wedding ceremony – but it goes way, way beyond them.

That is why at a wedding service in the Eastern Orthodox Churches the new husband and wife are crowned by the priest.  Their crowning is an action rich in meaning.  On one level it affirms that the bride and groom are king and queen for the day of their wedding.  On another level it gives them authority over any children to be born of their union. But it also points at a deeper level to those who bear witness to God’s love at the cost of their life.  In Christian art, crowns are the symbol of martyrs, those who, to quote the words of Jesus from our reading “lay down their life for their friends”, and particularly those who lay down their life for the love of God because there is no alternative which leaves them with any integrity.  Marriage, in that sense, is a kind of “white martyrdom”, an act of witness in which no blood is shed, but in which the ego of a husband or wife is laid low by the demands of self-giving love.

By their choice of reading for this celebration, the couple had set the bar for the future of their relationship high, some might think “impossibly high”. But, the closing words of Jesus in that reading remind us that it isn’t down to them, or to any of us, to be romantic heroes or heroines in our own strength.  In fact, most of love isn’t about heroism – or romance, for that matter, once the glamour and excitement of a celebration like Friday’s fades into memory.  Most of love is not about the grand gesture, but about the little deaths to selfishness and pride, the everyday exchanges, the patience, the willingness to forgive and be forgiven which come about when each partner puts the other’s good, the other’s happiness, ahead of their own.  Love is about learning who we are, and who the other is, within God’s love; and God’s love is the source and the sustainer of human love. Love is about bearing fruit, “fruit that will last”, says Jesus.  Our prayers on Friday were that the couple’s love for each other will indeed bear more and more fruit as each of them learns more fully the art of self-surrender and abides faithfully in one another’s love until their love becomes taken up wholly into the love of God.


A Church in crisis?

One of the changes identified in the British Social Attitudes survey for 2017 gave rise to such headlines as “Church in crisis as only 2% of young adults identify as C of E”.

There was, as you may imagine, a lot of hand-wringing about this, but the Revd Angela Rayner (newly ordained and serving as assistant curate in the Lynn Team Ministry in Norwich Diocese), called for a sense of proportion. ‘The Church of England’ she tweeted ‘is very rarely “in crisis”, (only when the tea runs out), but terminal decline is more of an issue. It may not be inevitable, and might be reversible if we would undertake certain steps.’

What follows is her list of twenty suggestions to halt – or reverse the decline.  Not all of them are easily applicable outside the UK, but I post them here for you to ponder.  What, among Ms Rayner’s list, is possible for us here in Genoa? What would never work because of where we are/who we are? What other possibilities would you suggest?

  1. All church buildings to be open daily from morning to dusk.
  2. Morning and Evening Prayer to be said publicly every day in every parish/benefice.
  3. Evening Prayer to be sung, if at all possible, once a week according to BCP.
  4. Mass to be said daily or at least four times per week in each Benefice (where possible).
  5. Mass to be celebrated on major feast days, not transferred to Sunday.
  6. Domestic liturgical practices to be introduced in every household (epiphany chalking, Advent calendars etc.)
  7. Abstinence from meat to be reintroduced on Fridays, and communal parish fasts to be agreed in Lent.
  8. Confession (or equivalent) to be advertised, encouraged and held weekly, not by appointment.
  9. Weekly catechism classes, and lay guilds of catechists trained by Dioceses.
  10. All parishes to go on pilgrimage once a year (locally or further afield)
  11. Spiritual direction to be given greater prominence, and more spiritual directors trained. All Christians encouraged to adopt spiritual directors.
  12. Links between non-church schools and churches to be strengthened, and schools welcomed frequently into church buildings esp on Sundays.
  13. Children to be involved in “up front” ways as much as possible in all church services e.g. choir, reading, serving.
  14. Children and youth to attend an annual festival/pilgrimage or similar to meet a wider variety of Christians.
  15. Nobody to be refused baptism, but church to appoint additional God-parents/supporters to encourage additional contact with families.
  16. Churching of women service to be updated, and mothers and fathers to be welcomed into church when children are born.
  17. Use of sacramentals to be encouraged in and out of church e.g. holy water stoops, rosaries, candles and medals.
  18. Public processions to be held a few times each year, and new businesses/classrooms/homes to be blessed frequently.
  19. Parishioners encouraged to give 5% of income to parish church.
  20. All clergy to wear clerical collars.

Ponte Morandi – a month on (14th September, 2018)

The Church of the Holy Ghost participated in the minute’s silence in memory of the victims and the “Nine Tailors” were rung on the ship’s bell of the “London Valour” immediately before the silence.  In the evening Tony Dickinson attended both the civic act of remembrance in Piazza de Ferrari and the memorial Mass in the Cathedral. 

Both the civic and the cathedral acts of remembrance for those who died in the collapse of the Ponte Morandi were “full house”, with standing-room only in San Lorenzo and the vast space of Piazza de Ferrari full of people. Young and old, men and women, teenagers and young children of all races gathered together in both venues, representatives of a city united, to show their grief and sense of loss, their solidarity with those who mourn most deeply, and their gratitude to those, vigili, police, volunteers of all kinds, who had undertaken the difficult and dangerous work of rescue and recovery. The civic remembrance began with a reading of the names of the dead, each with a short biographical sketch, to the accompaniment of the Adagio by Samuel Barber. Some were almost unbearably poignant, especially the last, of the youngest person to die. Here even the reader, who had kept control of his emotions through what must have been a horribly difficult task, almost lost it, and all the way through there was much furtive (and not-so-furtive) wiping of eyes and blowing of noses. Bishop Anselmi spoke well in the Piazza, finishing his contribution by leading the crowd in saying the Angelus, whose closing words, a plea to Mary to “Pray for us sinners, now and at the hour of our death”, were singularly appropriate. And it was good to see the vigili and others taking centre stage as they recalled their part in the tragedy. The Mass in the cathedral was solemn and dignified, and the names of the victims were again read out, this time within the framework of the Eucharistic prayer, giving a sense of thanksgiving for their lives as well as the offering of those lives to be taken up into the suffering and death of Jesus and transformed by the love and mercy of God.


On Thursday 10th May the Church marks the return of Jesus to the Father who sent him.  There will be a celebration of the Eucharist for Ascension Day at 1230, and the church will be open all day for people to drop in and pray.  This is being done as part of the global “Thy Kingdom Come” initiative, which runs from Ascension Day to Pentecost (10th-20th May). “Thy Kingdom Come” started in England a couple of years ago and is now being taken up enthusiastically (and ecumenically) in many countries. There will be morning and evening prayer at the Church of the Holy Ghost on the day as well as prayer stations and other resources.  I hope you will be able to join us.  If you would like to know more about “Thy Kingdom Come” and, particularly, about things that individuals and families can do during the ten days, please follow this link https://www.thykingdomcome.global/ to the website and then click on “Resources”. There will also, I hope, be material appearing on the “Church and Friends” FB page during the next few days, so please, if you are on Facebook, please keep an eye on that.


A new page in this church’s history:

We have Fr Tony Dickinson with us to provide an active ministry to this church and metropolitan area. A very exciting time and an important development for our congregation. Welcome!

Revd Canon Tony Dickinson

Born in Liverpool in 1948, Tony Dickinson was educated at Liverpool Collegiate School and New College, Oxford.  He worked in university administration at the University of Durham’s Institute of Education and the Open University’s Southern Regional office in Oxford before following a call to ordained ministry.   After training at Lincoln Theological College he was ordained in St Alban’s Abbey (deacon 1982: priest 1983).  Since then he has worked in parishes in Watford (1982-1986), Slough (1986-1994) and High Wycombe (1994-2018).  From 1995 to 2013 he was one of the team of Ecumenical Officers in the diocese of Oxford, serving for some years as team leader.  For the past 23 years he has also been the European Officer of the Diocese of Oxford, developing a formal partnership with the diocese of Växjö in the Church of Sweden and encouraging attendance at the German Protestant Kirchentag, which he has attended since 1985.  Since 2005 he has been an Honorary Canon of Christ Church Cathedral in Oxford.  He has been engaged in interfaith and intercultural relations for much of his ministry, with a particular focus on the encounter between Christians and Muslims, about which he has written.  He is also an experienced spiritual director.

Tony is a reasonably fluent French-speaker and can get by in German, Spanish and Italian (he is working on this!) as well as in Swedish.  He is married to Sandra, who is a health-care professional, and they have two grown-up children, Hugh and Beatrice.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Some of our locum chaplains who has served our church so generously in the past:

 

For February, including Ash Wednesday and the start of Lent, we welcome back Fr Gordon Bond SSC.

Fr GordonBy birth a Yorkshireman, I trained at Chichester Theological College, and my ministry has been spent very much south of my homeland, mostly in the Diocese of Chichester.

Before moving to the parish of St Mary East Grinstead, where I spent a large part of my priestly ministry, I was chaplain to Bishop Colin Docker, then Bishop of Horsham. I enjoyed my time working with Bishop Colin, but always saw my vocation in parish ministry.

I enjoyed being at Saint Mary’s, where, with a strong core of laity, we led a firm spiritual life in the catholic tradition of the Church of England.

Since retiring some ten years ago and battling with a few ill-health problems, I have been helping out in the parish of St Richard in Haywards Heath.

My two hobbies are Travel in Continental Europe (when I am fit and able) and I enjoy Modern Foreign Languages. I speak reasonable French and a little German. My Italian is improving in terms of nouns: verbs are next!

I count it a privilege to serve once again the spiritual community at Holy Ghost.

 

 

Fr Bernard Fray is back with us for the month of January.

 I have been in parish ministry for some twenty years. Having previously been in teaching at King Edward VI School Lichfield and then deputy head at an independent school in Hampshire, I moved back north to take on the role of Head at a school near Scarborough .
I was ordained in York Minster and still continue to serve in the York Diocese.   Since retiring from full time ministry, I have enjoyed my several visits to Genoa, both in the heat of summer and the cold of winter. I have had two Christmases here. I have also served  at St. Moritz in Switzerland on three winter seasons, and in addition I serve as chaplain on the Saga cruise liners.     I love travelling, modern languages and performing music (when I can).

 

 

 

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We welcome for the first time Bishop David Farrer, and his wife Helen, to be wish us for most of November then Advent and Christmas.

Bishop David Farrer was born in England but moved to Australia as a child. He trained as a horticulturist in the Dandenong Ranges and at Burnley Horticultural College, Melbourne before studying for the ordained ministry in Adelaide. He was ordained priest in 1969 and a few years later returned to Melbourne where he served in the parishes of Brunswick and Eastern Hill, was Chaplain to Parliament of Victoria, a Canon of St Paul’s Cathedral and also Archdeacon of Melbourne. His commitment to community work in Australia earned him the title of Citizen of the Year in Brunswick in 1983 “for work with the unemployed and homeless”.

He was consecrated bishop in 1998 and was Bishop of Wangaratta from 1998 to 2008, during which time he helped establish four low-fee Anglican schools.  His vision for these schools was that they should be low-fee Anglican Schools for the growing populations of the Diocese, to work closely with the local parishes and to meet the educational social and spiritual needs of the children who attended. From their very beginnings he and the other founders have overseen amazing growth of what was obviously a very much wanted and needed educational option.

In 2008 Bishop David returned to England to become Vicar of the Parish of Arundel in West Sussex: he also served as an Assistant Bishop in the Diocese of Chichester. Since then he has done an eighteen-month locum in the Parish of All Saints East St Kilda in Melbourne and a shorter locum at the nearby St James’ Parish.

Bishop David and Helen have two sons and five grandchildren in Australia.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

For the month of October and the first part of November we welcome the return of Fr Peter Blackburn, long-time locum chaplain with this church, he is now based in London.

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We welcome for the first time to our church Fr Richard Gowty who sends this message to us all:

Greetings to you all from Australia.

I am looking forward to being your Chaplain for the month of September.

It will be the third time I have served in Italy, having been a locum Chaplain on previous occasions in Lake Como and Taormina.

My wife Maggie and I live on Queensland’s Sunshine Coast with our dog Barney where I am an Archdeacon and in charge of the parish of Palmwoods. Maggie is a retired teacher, and together we enjoy the many blessings of life in a wonderful country, enjoying good health and surrounded by family and friends.

We have three married daughters, Anna, Kate and Sophie and seven grandchildren, all of whom live in reasonably close proximity to us.

We love to travel, especially in Europe, with Italy and the Italian people close to our hearts. We have lived in a number of overseas places where I have worked as a priest, including London and the USA, but we are pleased to call Australia home.

Besides our love for the Anglican church, we have many interests. Obviously we both enjoy travel and meeting new friends, and look forward to doing so amongst you in September.

Maggie manages the Parish Op shop in Palmwoods and enjoys reading, keeping up with family and friends, cooking and gardening; I am a keen golfer as well as an unashamed lover of Italian food and culture, and this increases every time we have the privilege of visiting your country. Together we are proud grandparents to Lily, Emma, Harry, George, Daisy, Bell and Phoebe.

Maggie and I will shortly leave Australia to be with you in Genoa. We very much look forward to this posting and pray that my ministry among you will be a blessing to both you and us.

With warm regards

Archdeacon Richard and Maggie Gowty

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We welcome back to our church, after quite some time (!), for the last Sunday in July and the whole month of August Fr. Michael Bullock.

I was last in Genova in 2000, having spent eighteen months as Chaplain of Liguria. There will be one or two people I remember from those days, and I look forward to meeting them again and also getting to know new faces. Since leaving Liguria I was Chaplain at Lisbon (Portugal) for a number of years before retiring to England in 2012. I have lived in Spalding in the east of England since then, interspersed with periods of locum duty in the Diocese in Europe in various countries all of which
have interested and stimulated me. History and languages and the people who speak them have always been a joy. I am writing this from Norfolk (England) where I am attending the annual retreat and chapter meeting of the Oratory of the Good Shepherd (OGS) a religious society of celibate priests and laymen to which I have belonged since 1993.
After leaving Genova in September I hope to take up the ministry of Chaplain of Bonn and Cologne (Germany) in November.
Michael Bullock OGS

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For June and most of July we were happy to have Fr Bernard Fray back with us.

 I have been in parish ministry for some twenty years. Having previously been in teaching at King Edward VI School Lichfield and then deputy head at an independent school in Hampshire, I moved back north to take on the role of Head at a school near Scarborough .
I was ordained in York Minster and still continue to serve in the York Diocese.   Since retiring from full time ministry, I have enjoyed my several visits to Genoa, both in the heat of summer and the cold of winter. I have had two Christmases here. I have also served  at St. Moritz in Switzerland on three winter seasons, and in addition I serve as chaplain on the Saga cruise liners.     I love travelling, modern languages and performing music (when I can).

 

 

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We welcome back to our church for the month of May Rev. Douglas Greenaway

The Rev. Douglas Andrew Greenaway was Ordained to the Holy Order of Priests in the Anglican/Episcopal Diocese of Washington and completed his Master of Divinity at Wesley Theological Seminary, in Washington, DC. He currently serves as Priest Associate at St. Paul’s Rock Creek Parish. Prior ministries include serving as Assistant Rector at St. Alban’s Parish, Washington, DC, as Clergy Chaplain for Episcopal Students at American University, and as on-call Chaplain at Washington Hospital Center.

Since 1985, Fr. Greenaway has served as an advocate and government affairs specialist.  As President & CEO of the NATIONAL WIC ASSOCIATION, NWA, since 1990, Douglas is responsible for directing the Association as well as representing the interests of its members – the 50 States, 40 Indian Nations, and Trust Territories, 2200 local agencies, and 10,000 clinics who operate the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children as well as the nearly 9 million mothers and young children who participate in WIC – before Congress, the US Department of Agriculture, other Federal agencies and the White House.  His ministry with NWA has been recognized by the Presiding Bishop of the Episcopal Church, USA.

A Master’s graduate of The Catholic University of America’s School of Architecture in Washington, DC, Douglas practiced his profession as an Architect for eight years in Los Angeles, India, Washington, DC, and Germany before returning to an earlier love, public policy!

In 1974, after graduating in Political Science/Sociology from Carleton University in Ottawa, Canada, Douglas began work with the Research Office of the Official Opposition in Canadian Parliament, writing speeches and debate notes for the Leader of the Official Opposition and Opposition Members of Parliament.

A resident of Washington, DC, Douglas was born in Belleville, Ontario, Canada. He is the proud father of Vishal Sean and a new grandson Kavi Vishal. Both father and son are avid, dedicated skiers.

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For Easter and our service of Confirmation we welcomed back Fr Gordon Bond SSC.

Fr GordonBy birth a Yorkshireman, I trained at Chichester Theological College, and my ministry has been spent very much south of my homeland, mostly in the Diocese of Chichester.

Before moving to the parish of St Mary East Grinstead, where I spent a large part of my priestly ministry, I was chaplain to Bishop Colin Docker, then Bishop of Horsham. I enjoyed my time working with Bishop Colin, but always saw my vocation in parish ministry.

I enjoyed being at Saint Mary’s, where, with a strong core of laity, we led a firm spiritual life in the catholic tradition of the Church of England.

Since retiring some ten years ago and battling with a few ill-health problems, I have been helping out in the parish of St Richard in Haywards Heath.

My two hobbies are Travel in Continental Europe (when I am fit and able) and I enjoy Modern Foreign Languages. I speak reasonable French and a little German. My Italian is improving in terms of nouns: verbs are next!

I count it a privilege to have served the spiritual community at Holy Ghost on several occasions – twice now to celebrate together the joy of the Resurrection.

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Priests at the Church of the Holy Ghost Genova 2016-2017

Here are the names of the priests coming to serve this church over the next months. We thank them for their dedication and witness.

2016

  • December   –   Peter Cavanagh

2017

  • January 1   –    Peter Cavanagh
  • January      –    Clifford Owen
  • February    –    Ed Hanson
  • March         –    Elizabeth Bussmann
  • April            –    Gordon Bond
  • May             –    Douglas Greenaway
  • June            –    Bernard Fray
  • July             –    Bernard Fray
  • August        –    Michael Bullock
  • September –    Richard Gowty
  • October      –    Peter Blackburn
  • November –    Douglas Greenaway
  • December. –   Michael Bullock

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For the month of March we have been privileged to welcome back Rev.d Elizabeth Bussmann-Morton. She is also our Environment Officer for the Anglican Diocese in Europe.

I have lived in Switzerland since 1971 and trained originally as a Deacon in the Swiss Church. However, in 2000 my husband Edi, and I returned to England where I trained as a Church Army Evangelist in Sheffield. We had thought we would stay for two or three years but it became 14! In 2014 we returned to Switzerland to enjoy our grandchildren while they are still relatively young. When we left in 2000 we had 1, now there are 10!

In England I was rector of two parishes in Surrey, a ministry I really loved. Now I help twice a month at St Peter’s in Chateau d’Oex and am also the Environmental Officer for the Diocese in Europe. I have also discovered the privilege of being a locum minister. This is my first time outside of Switzerland where I have been a seasonal minister for ICS in places such as Zermatt, Interlaken and Wengen. Our Golden Retriever, Monty, is also here in Genova and he LOVES it! Never had so many pats and kisses, not to mention all the dogs everywhere we go! Life will be very boring back home…..

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For February 2017 Holy Ghost Anglican Church has welcomed back Father Ed Hanson.

Ed Hanson

The Rev. Edward W. Hanson lives in Twickenham, England (within shouting distant of the RFU stadium, although sadly not a fan himself).  Originally from Boston, Massachusetts, Ed worked as an academic historian before training for ordination initially at the Episcopal Divinity School, Cambridge, Mass., and then at Ripon College Cuddesdon, Oxford.  He was ordained at Lincoln Cathedral and served a curacy in Lincoln City before moving to an incumbency in the Diocese of Chelmsford.  For ten years he was rector of three village parishes in the south of Essex and served as Rural Dean before taking a (slightly) early retirement in 2014.  Since then, Ed has been busy with locum work both in the West London area and most recently with the Diocese in Europe.  When one retires as a Rector, one does not retire as a priest.  In fact, it usually means that one can own one’s priesthood more fully when not weighed down with administration and meetings.  It has also allowed more time for a return to historical research and writing (early American history, genealogy, and a current project in Italian history), as well as travel through much of Europe which he has still not visited.

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January 2017 – Fr Clifford Owen

Clifford and Avis Owen

Clifford retired from the Chaplaincy in Ostend and Bruges Belgium in October 2012 so is now into his fifth year of retirement. Apart from one or two short locums a year he has been quite busy in Huntingdon Deanery where he took six weddings last summer. Apart from retirement ministry Clifford has tried to keep up the practical interests that he knows cannot last for more than a few years. He works a day each week on the Nene Valley Steam Railway as a volunteer in the workshop. Twice a year he helps on archaeological digs in Cambridgeshire and has recently joined Huntingdon Male Voice Choir.
Avis continues to work as a volunteer research assistant in Huntingdonshire County Record Office and has taken up learning Latin to understand the medieval parish registers. She continues her sewing interest and has made three recent outstanding bed quilts.
Increasingly time is being taken up with assisting elderly relations as well as giving back to our four children and grandchildren some of the time they have missed from us over the ten years we have worked in the Diocese in Europe before retirement.

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Advent and Christmas – We are very grateful to Fr Peter Cavanagh for stepping in and joining us mid-December till the New Year.

fr-peter-cavanagh

Peter Cavanagh was ordained in 1973 in the Diocese of Liverpool and after serving a curacy was appointed Vicar of St Columba’s Church, Anfield in 1979.  St Columba’s is an Art Deco church building and during his time there a restoration of this wonderful church was undertaken.

In 1994 the Parish Hall was burnt down (on November 5th!) and a new Parish Centre was added to the church building.  In 1997 Peter was appointed  Vicar of Lancaster and stayed there until retirement in 2010.  Throughout his ministry Peter has served on various committees connected with the care and preservation of church buildings, and now helps find new uses for churches now surplus to requirement.
He enjoys reading, cooking, music (especially opera) and is an avid reader.

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For November 2016 we welcome the return of Fr John Smith:

Canon John Smith

Canon John Smith

I am a retired Anglican priest and diocesan educationalist, living in Nottinghamshire, but most recently in paid employment in Kent, who has been here three of four times previously. Proof of my marriage is in the photo, and I am much occupied by travelling in Italy and the USA, where our son has lived and worked since 2000, and our only grandchildren are. I love playing chess, reading novels and history, doing the Guardian crossword, looking at art, the ballet, listening to music, speaking French, and leading Church of England worship.

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For October 2016 we welcome Fr John Bennett, for the first time, to our church.

IMG_0700John and Rita Bennett live in the Yorkshire Dales, in the UK. Rita is a retired teacher. John is a retired Anglican priest who has served in North Yorkshire, both as a Methodist superintendent and an Anglican priest and now works in the chaplaincy team in Ripon Cathedral. They have organised a number of ecumenical pilgrimages in both Rome and Assisi and currently John is the Yorkshire representative, in support of the Anglican Centre in Rome.  He is also a member of the Anglican Franciscan third order. They have served overseas in the Church of Bangladesh and John is a trustee of Christians Aware, an international and ecumenical movement aiming to develop multi-cultural understanding.   They have a love of Italy, history, the arts and the countryside.

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For the month of September we welcomed the return of Fr Peter Blackburn.

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For the month of July we welcome the return of Fr David Emmott.

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For the month of June we welcome the return of Fr Lawson Nagel.

Fr Lawson

It’s great to be back in Genoa after a five-year gap! My wife Mary and I lead busy lives – I am the Vicar of Aldwick in the Diocese of Chichester and Mary is the Secretary of the Catholic Group in General Synod – but coming to Genoa allows us to have a ‘working holiday’ and meet up with friends old and new. Back in 2011 we had our two younger children Tim and Polly with us; both are now married and Polly and her husband Gareth are expecting their second child in September. Our elder son Tom works in London and rings bells in various churches, and our elder daughter Lucy is a deacon in Bristol. Over the years I have been able to point several priests from the Catholic tradition towards Genoa, and it’s good that Mary and I have been able to come this year ourselves . There’s such a warm welcome here for us, and for you too – come and see!

Fr Lawson

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For Easter we welcome back Fr Gordon Bond SSC.

Fr GordonBy birth a Yorkshireman, I trained at Chichester Theological College, and my ministry has been spent very much south of my homeland, mostly in the Diocese of Chichester.

Before moving to the parish of St Mary East Grinstead, where I spent a large part of my priestly ministry, I was chaplain to Bishop Colin Docker, then Bishop of Horsham. I enjoyed my time working with Bishop Colin, but always saw my vocation in parish ministry.

I enjoyed being at Saint Mary’s, where, with a strong core of laity, we led a firm spiritual life in the catholic tradition of the Church of England.

Since retiring some ten years ago and battling with a few ill-health problems, I have been helping out in the parish of St Richard in Haywards Heath.

My two hobbies are Travel in Continental Europe (when I am fit and able) and I enjoy Modern Foreign Languages. I speak reasonable French and a little German. My Italian is improving in terms of nouns: verbs are next!

I count it a privilege to have served the spiritual community at Holy Ghost on several occasions – twice now to celebrate together the joy of the Resurrection.

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For March 2016 we welcomed Fr John Bennett, for the first time, to our church.

IMG_0700John and Rita Bennett live in the Yorkshire Dales, in the UK. Rita is a retired teacher. John is a retired Anglican priest who has served in North Yorkshire, both as a Methodist superintendent and an Anglican priest and now works in the chaplaincy team in Ripon Cathedral. They have organised a number of ecumenical pilgrimages in both Rome and Assisi and currently John is the Yorkshire representative, in support of the Anglican Centre in Rome.  He is also a member of the Anglican Franciscan third order. They have served overseas in the Church of Bangladesh and John is a trustee of Christians Aware, an international and ecumenical movement aiming to develop multi-cultural understanding.   They have a love of Italy, history, the arts and the countryside.

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Sunday March 20th: Palm Sunday Address

Sunday March 13th:   Passion Sunday Address and today’s Baptism

Sunday March 6th:       A Message for Mothering Sunday from Revd John

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Here are some of the profiles of chaplains who come to serve the International Anglican Church in Genova

For January 2017 we will welcome back Father Clifford Owen owen picture

Holy Ghost Anglican Church welcomes Rev. Dr. Clifford Owen and his wife, Avis, who have joined us from England. Prior to becoming a priest, Fr.Clifford served in the Royal Navy for 10 years as an Engineering Officer. His tours of duty took him to the Far East, Persian Gulf, Mediterranean and the Baltic.

Fr. Clifford was ordained priest in 1974 in the Dioceseof St. Edmundsbury and Ipswich. In 1976 he moved to the Guildford Diocese, where he worked in
a new housing area near Bordon army camp and was successful in building an ecumenical church with the Methodists and URCs. It was here also that
he became involved in the healing ministry. Then in 1989, he moved to rural ministry in the Teme Valley of Worcestershire where he was also the Diocesan Ecumenical Officer.
In 2002 Fr. Clifford served as chaplain at Holy Trinity parish on the Greek island of Corfu where he was involved in helping to plant new congregations on Corfu, and also on the islands of Paxos and Lefkada.
In 2008 Fr. Clifford moved to the English speaking churches of Brugge and Oostende in Belgium. He officially retired from there in 2012. He now lives in the Diocese of Ely in the UK and keeps busy doing supply work at different churches, as a Day Chaplain at the Ely Cathedral and as a trustee of the Acorn and Whitehill Chase trusts.
In 2013 Fr. Clifford did an extended stint as locum chaplain at St. Luke’s in Fontainebleau, France.
In his retirement, Fr. Clifford now works as a volunteer on the Nene Valley Railway, Peterborough, one of the UK’s 113 steam locomotive heritage lines, where he is able to lend some of his engineering experience from back in the “old days.”
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