Chaplain’s Page

Poets of Christ’s Coming (1)

The three Fridays of this year’s Advent each mark a saint’s day, in the calendar of either Common Worship or the Book of Common Prayer.  The first two Fridays are “lesser festivals”, days for which the main Common Worship calendar provides no proper readings, although there is a special collect for the day.  The third is, in the Prayer Book calendar, a “red letter day”, with its own special collect, epistle and gospel.  By coincidence, the first two Fridays commemorate saints who are significant Christian poets, as well as being important figures in the history of the Church, while the red letter day celebrates an apostle whose given name is the same as the surname of a poet in the succession of Anglican poet-priests which includes figures as diverse as John Donne, George Herbert, Thomas Traherne, the Wesleys, and John Keble.  Between them, our three poets span seventeen centuries, from the fourth to the twentieth – and they do so in the order in which they appear in the calendar.

So, in the first of these three posts, we head back in time to the fourth century of our era, to a point in history when the European world was changing, the period which scholars call “late antiquity”. During this period Rome’s power over the Mediterranean world was beginning to ebb increasingly quickly.  The “limes”, the frontier which separated the Roman world from the barbarians, was becoming more porous and fragile.  Since the beginning of the 4th century, following the Emperor Constantine’s vision of a cross of light and a voice from heaven telling him “In this sign you shall conquer”, the Christian Church had emerged from the catacombs and was being transformed from a subterranean and suspect movement into a serious actor in the mainstream life and culture of the Empire.

Aurelius Ambrosius was part of all these changes.  He was born, around AD 340, into a Christian family.  His father was a senior government official, the Praetorian Prefect of Gaul – a post which it would have been inconceivable for a Christian to hold three decades earlier.  At the time of his son’s birth he was based in the important military centre of Augusta Treverorum, the modern-day German city of Trier.  Ambrosius, or, to give him his English name, Ambrose, followed his father into government service.  In his early thirties he was appointed to the governorship of Liguria (so Genoa was on his patch) and Emilia, based in Milan, which was effectively the capital of the Western Roman Empire.  Rome was too far from the frontiers and increasingly a backwater, although it still had a huge symbolic significance.

Ambrose had not been in the post much more than a couple of years when the Bishop of Milan died.  The Christian community in Milan was deeply divided between those who held the orthodox faith as defined by the Council of Nicaea nearly fifty years before and those who followed the beliefs of Arius, who held that, while Jesus was more than simply human, he was not fully divine and that there had been a time when he was not.  It was important, given the strategic importance of Milan, that the city should remain at peace and Ambrose took part in the election of the new bishop, to ensure fair play and to prevent the city descending into riot and, probably, bloodshed.

Ambrose was admired and trusted by both sides and it is recorded that, as soon as he appeared in the church where the election was due to take place, the cry went up “Ambrose for bishop!”  Now, Ambrose was almost totally unqualified for this post.  He was a Christian, as his parents had been, but he had never been baptised.  Like many in government service (including the Emperor Constantine) he had postponed baptism in case his official duties caused him to sin – and left an indelible stain after he had been, to use the old expression, “washed in the blood of the Lamb”.

So, Ambrose refused to accept election.  But the people of Milan were insistent.  So was the Emperor.  In the face of that amount of pressure Ambrose gave way.  He was baptised, ordained, consecrated and appointed bishop of Milan within a week.  Which makes all the hoo-ha when Justin Welby became Archbishop of Canterbury about his lack of episcopal experience seem very petty-minded!   And the people who shouted for the election of Ambrose were proved to be wiser than most crowds.  He was a brilliant bishop.  He was, as you might expect from his background, an outstanding administrator and organiser.  He was also a fine preacher – and because, unlike many of his contemporaries, he knew Greek, he was able to keep in touch with what was going on in the Church in the Eastern half of the Empire. This meant that he was up-to-date with theological and liturgical thinking. 

One of the developments in the Eastern Church during the second half of the fourth century was the increasing use of hymns in worship.  Ambrose took over this development with such enthusiasm that he is often described as the founder of western hymnody.  He realised, like Martin Luther at the time of the Reformation, and the Wesleys in 18th-century England, that hymns were a very effective way of teaching ordinary people theology.  Unlike many poets of the fourth century, who were still working in the same style and with the same verse-forms as the Roman poets Virgil and Horace nearly four hundred years before, he chose simple measures that could be remembered, and, like the Iona community in our own day, he preferred to use simple language – something we don’t always realise when we sing Ambrose’s hymns (yes, we still sing them today), because when they were translated into English in the 19th century, the convention was to use “poetic diction” and obsolete forms, like “thee” and “thou”. So tonight, I’m not going to talk further about Ambrose’s influence on the Western Church, or about how he became the conscience of the Empire, or about his key role in the conversion of St Augustine of Hippo.

Instead, I’m going to end with a three of the hymns which he wrote for the people of Milan, and which are still sung today.

The first is a hymn he wrote for the dawning of the day.  Its Latin title is “Splendor Paternae gloriae”.  In English it is known as “O splendour of God’s glory bright”:

O splendour of God’s glory bright,
O Thou that bringest light from light;
O Light of light, light’s living spring,
O day, all days illumining.

O Thou true Sun, on us Thy glance
Let fall in royal radiance;
The Spirit’s sanctifying beam
Upon our earthly senses stream.

The Father, too, our prayers implore,
Father of glory evermore;
The Father of all grace and might,
To banish sin from our delight.

To guide whate’er we nobly do,
With love all envy to subdue;
To make ill fortune turn to fair,
And give us grace our wrongs to bear.

Our mind be in His keeping placed
Our body true to Him and chaste,
Where only faith her fire shall feed,
To burn the tares of Satan’s seed.

And Christ to us for food shall be,
From Him our drink that welleth free,
The Spirit’s wine, that maketh whole,
And, mocking not, exalts the soul.

Rejoicing may this day go hence;
Like virgin dawn our innocence,
Like fiery noon our faith appear,
Nor known the gloom of twilight drear.

Morn in her rosy car is borne;
Let Him come forth our perfect morn,
The Word in God the Father one,
The Father perfect in the Son.

The second hymn is one for the ending of the day, or rather “the lighting of the lamps”, which was an important time of day in an age when electric light at the touch of a switch was unknown.  In Latin its first line is “Deus Creator omnium” (“God, creator of all”).  In English we know it as “Creator of the earth and sky”:

Creator of the earth and sky,

ruling the firmament on high,

clothing the day with robes of light,

blessing with gracious sleep the night.

That rest may comfort weary men,

and brace to useful toil again,

and soothe awhile the harassed mind,

and sorrow’s heavy load unbind.

 

Day sinks; we thank thee for thy gift;

night comes; and once again we lift

our prayer and vows and hymns that we

against all ills may shielded be.

 

Thee let the secret heart acclaim,

thee let our tuneful voices name,

round thee our chaste affections cling

thee sober reason own as King.

 

That when black darkness closes day,

and shadows thicken round our way,

faith may no darkness know, and night

from faith’s clear beam may borrow light.

 

Rest not, my heaven born mind and will;

rest, all the thoughts and deeds of ill;

may faith its watch unwearied keep,

and cool the dreaming warmth of sleep.

 

From cheats of sense, Lord, keep me free;

and let my heart’s depth dream of thee;

let not my envious foe draw near,

to break my rest with any fear.

Finally, I’m going to share with you a hymn that Ambrose wrote for Christmas Eve.  His original version begins with a paraphrase of the first verse of Psalm 80, but most hymn-books open with the second verse, which begins with the words, “Veni, Redemptor gentium”.   For that reason we know it as “Come, thou Redeemer of the earth” (which is what the Latin means):

Come, thou Redeemer of the earth,

and manifest thy virgin birth:

let every age adoring fall;

such birth befits the God of all.

 

Begotten of no human will,

but of the Spirit, thou art still

the Word of God in flesh arrayed,

the promised fruit to man displayed.

 

The virgin womb that burden gained

with virgin honour all unstained;

the banners there of virtue glow;

God in his temple dwells below.

 

Forth from his chamber goeth he,

that royal home of purity,

a giant in twofold substance one,

rejoicing now his course to run.

 

From God the Father he proceeds,

to God the Father back he speeds;

his course he runs to death and hell,

returning on God’s throne to dwell.

 

O equal to thy Father, thou!

Gird on thy fleshly mantle now;

the weakness of our mortal state

with deathless might invigorate.

 

Thy cradle here shall glitter bright,

and darkness breathe a newer light,

where endless faith shall shine serene,

and twilight never intervene.

Tony Dickinson

Farewell to Moses

Advent Sunday was the last time when we shall see (at least for the foreseeable future) the smiling face of our dear brother Moses Adesina.  In the short time that Moses has been with us, he has become a greatly valued member of our church family and has played a significant part of our church life, whether up at the front, as he was on Advent Sunday morning, or quietly in the background, working with Peter Asemwote and Lis Watkins to set up the church on Sundays, or helping Peter and others tidy the church grounds.  He has also been seen regularly welcoming visitors, serving refreshments and shifting furniture for concerts and church lunches.  On 5th December he will be on his way to Nairobi, to begin the final stage of training for ordained ministry in Christ’s Church.  It has been a long and winding journey and it is quite possible that there may be one or two more twists in it yet, but God is faithful and the One who has called Moses, and has brought him thus far, will make sure that he fulfils the ministry to which he is being called.  We wish Moses safe journeys from Genoa to Nairobi and a fruitful and blessed time as a student at Carlile College.  Please pray for him, as he begins this new stage of his journey towards priesthood.  On his last day with us we presented him with two simple gifts, a suitably inscribed new Bible, and a pen-and-ink sketch of the church as a token of our thanks for all that he has given by his presence among us.


Remembrance in Bordighera

I have done a fair bit of “depping” in my time, usually for bishops or archdeacons on ecumenical occasions in the UK.  Before today I had never “depped” for an ambassador.  HE Ms Morris was scheduled to give the keynote address at the ecumenical commemoration in Bordighera’s War Cemetery today, but Mrs May required her presence at a meeting in Palermo, so that she had to head south instead of north.  As a result, I was asked by the local congregation to step in (I was already down to lead the prayers).  This is what I said (the “reading” to which I refer was Matthew 5:1-12):

When I was a curate, thirty-plus years ago, I used to pay regular visits to one of the older inhabitants of the parish where I served.  Edgar had led an interesting life.  As a master carpenter in the 1920s and 1930s he worked on the state-rooms of the great Cunard liners, the “Queen Mary” and “Queen Elizabeth”.  In the following decade he found himself at Leavesden Aerodrome (now the studios where the Harry Potter films were made), working on the production of Halifax bombers for the Royal Air Force.  But the reason I mention him today is that as a young man, despite his poor eyesight, he had enlisted in a cavalry unit and been sent to fight on the Struma Front on the border between Greece and Bulgaria.  He always said that the Struma Front was one of the “forgotten fronts” of the First World War, although several nations, including Britain and Italy, were involved in the fighting.

For most British people an all-but exclusive focus on the horrors of the Western Front means that most other campaigns of the First World War, including the war in Italy, are also largely forgotten, even though the twelve battles, culminating in the disaster of Caporetto, which were fought along the river Isonzo between 1915 and 1917 were among the bloodiest of the war, “like Flanders”, someone has commented, “but two thousand feet up and with trenches dug into rock and ice instead of mud”, and in 1917 an expeditionary force was sent from Britain.

Today, as we remember, our thoughts are focused on eighty-three young and not-so-young men and one woman who died in the military hospitals here, either of wounds received in that campaign or from the flu’ pandemic that overlapped its ending: riflemen, gunners, sappers, mechanics, medics, clerks, and one stray civilian, as well as the inevitable PBI, as my father (a gunner) used to call them; men from all parts of Britain who served in that expeditionary force, men from Jamaica and Barbados, one man from north-west India – and men from half a dozen provinces of the Austro-Hungarian Empire, Czech, Croat, Transylvanian, Slovenian: former enemies, brought together in the place of their death and burial.

We remember, in sorrow, the competitive egoisms, personal and national, which pushed the world into war a hundred years ago, and which still afflict our planet. The “War to end War” whose victims we commemorate was far from being the final harvest of the bitter fruit of human arrogance and greed.  We remember, too, the fruits of courage and comradeship which sustained those who served their countries in time of conflict, and we give thanks for the generous hospitality of communities like Bordighera, which saw not “allies” and “enemies” but human beings in need of help and healing.  And we look to the words of Jesus which we heard in the reading from St Matthew’s Gospel to find a remedy for the destructive drives which led to those years of slaughter along the Isonzo.

Jesus’ words are an uncomfortable reminder that, despite appearances,  the blessing of God rests not on the wealthy and the powerful, but on those who confront and accept the pain of the world, those who strive for justice, who show mercy, who work for peace.  The Sermon on the Mount is not, as some have called it, “an impossible ethic”.  It is the blueprint for human survival – and an unwavering critique of human power structures and hierarchies.

Jesus calls us to abandon the quest for status, to lay down the self-righteousness that denies or defies the righteousness of God who has compassion on our enemies as much as on us who suffer at their hands.  He calls us to live as though we truly believe in the God who has made all humanity in his image and likeness, Czech, Croat, Hungarian, Romanian, Slovenian equally with Italian, Jamaican, Indian and Briton.  He calls us to have confidence in the ultimate triumph of God’s love and his justice.  He calls us to believe in the possibility of God’s “shalom”, that peace which is not just the absence of war, but the fulfilment of the prophet’s vision of swords beaten into ploughshares in a transformed world where all creatures live in harmony.  To believe in that possibility is to believe in good news, to believe in the reality of God’s coming kingdom.


A brief reflection on All Saints’ Day

All Saints’ Day is the day when we remember with thanksgiving not just the saints with a capital S, but all who have been important for our growth as Christians and our progress in discipleship. They may have been our companions on the journey for a short while or for half a lifetime and more. They may have been models of holiness through whom God’s glory shone for us. They may have been ordinary people who had the gift of encouragement, knowing somehow just the right word to say at the right time. Whoever they may have been, whatever they may have been for us, we give thanks for them among those “spirits of the righteous made perfect” listed in today’s first reading among the inhabitants of the heavenly Jerusalem.
 
We give thanks, too, for countless others, not known to us, and not formally recognised by any Christian tradition, but who bore witness to the living Christ in the way they lived and died.
 
Three years ago, on a visit to our son when he was at university in Sheffield, the Dickinson family spent a day in the Peak District.  In the afternoon we stopped for tea in the pretty Derbyshire village of Eyam. Now, Eyam is not just a pretty village. It is also a rather grim footnote in English history. It was hit in late 1665 by the plague which had ravaged London earlier that year. 350 people in the village died, but led by their Rector, William Mompesson, and his predecessor, Thomas Stanley*, the people of Eyam took the decision to prevent the plague spreading further by putting themselves in quarantine until the illness had burnt itself out.
 
William and Thomas could have left, but they stayed and ministered to the sick and dying, as did William’s wife, Catherine. She sent their children away to safety, but she refused to leave her husband. Toward the end of the outbreak, she too caught the plague and died, bearing witness in death as in life to the love of the Son of God who laid down his life for his friends. Since that visit I have remembered her, and William, and Thomas Stanley, among the holy ones of God, as people who lived those eight blessings which Jesus proclaimed in today’s Gospel. And I shall be praying for all who find themselves, as they did, in the front line of the conflict between duty, love, and safety.
*Thomas Stanley was one of those “ejected” clergy who had been driven out of the Church of England in 1662 because they could not, in conscience, consent to using only the Book Of Common Prayer in public worship.  That he worked so closely with his successor in such a tragic situation says a great deal about them both.

Praying through Brexit

Bishop Robert wrote recently to all the chaplaincies in the diocese asking for prayer in the run-up to 29th March, and especially as the negotiations reach their climax. Here is the content of his letter:

Dear Brothers and Sisters in Christ,

Invitation to Pray

Over the next 6 months, the UK will be negotiating its departure from the European Union. This is a project of immense political and technical complexity. However, if the project goes badly, the UK could enter a period of crisis, of a kind that post-war Britain has not so far experienced. I therefore call upon you to join me in praying for the negotiating process.

Whilst many are rightly concerned about how any deal will eventually be agreed by the UK Parliament, the first big milestone in the process is a summit in Brussels next week. This will convene on 17 and 18 October and brings together the Prime Ministers/Presidents of the 28 EU States. If there is good progress but more remains to be settled, then there is likely to be a further Summit in November. Some 90% of the Withdrawal Agreement (including the areas related to Citizens’ Rights) has already been agreed, but further work is needed on trade arrangements and the Irish border. Both sides want a deal. However, as in any deal-making, things can go wrong, and the parties could talk past each other or fall out with one another. No-one should be under any illusion as to the seriousness of these negotiations.

I am aware that many of the recipients of this letter and those in our congregations are not British. However, this is a matter of more general European concern. So can I specifically ask you to pray for the negotiations in your Sunday services this coming weekend? Also, please consider setting aside 17 and 18 October as days of prayer. Pray specifically:

• For the civil servants working ‘under the radar’ to construct forms of agreement
• For the leaders of the nations to act in the interests of all their people and for the common good.

With all good wishes,

Yours in Christ,

+Robert Gibraltar in Europe


Reflections on a marriage

On 5th October I conducted my first wedding blessing in Italy.  The actual marriage took place in Beijing earlier in the year and the guests had come from many parts of the world.  Some had come from the western edge of the Atlantic Isles, others from the heart of the Middle Kingdom, and the rest from many different places between and beyond.  What drew them was probably the most powerful force in the universe, the force of love.

They had come to acknowledge and celebrate the love between the newly married couple, and had come because of love for them.  What drew each of them, many after long journeys, was their love for the couple, whether as family members, friends, or colleagues.  And what the couple had set at the heart of this celebration of their love was a powerful reminder that their love is a reflection of another love, the love that, in the words of the greatest of all Italian poets, “moves the sun and the other stars”.  Love is the nature of God.  Love is the power that creates the universe and sustains it in being. Love is the power which seizes and transforms human lives.

They had chosen for the reading a passage from St John’s Gospel (ch. 15: vv. 9-17) which spells it out the nature of love with an almost terrifying clarity.  The love of which Jesus speaks to his disciples, in that passage, and which lies at the heart of the universe, is not “warm fuzzies”, fluffy kittens, bluebirds, hearts and flowers.  The love of which Jesus speaks to his disciples is a love which shows itself in self-giving, self-emptying, commitment to the beloved – even to the point of death.  “Love one another” says Jesus, “as I have loved you.”  Those words are, if you think about it, frightening.  Loving as Jesus loves means setting no limits, no boundaries to our giving, our sharing of life, our readiness to forgive – and to be forgiven.  Loving as Jesus loves means being open to the world as well as open to each other. It includes all the commitments to which the partners pledge themselves at a wedding ceremony – but it goes way, way beyond them.

That is why at a wedding service in the Eastern Orthodox Churches the new husband and wife are crowned by the priest.  Their crowning is an action rich in meaning.  On one level it affirms that the bride and groom are king and queen for the day of their wedding.  On another level it gives them authority over any children to be born of their union. But it also points at a deeper level to those who bear witness to God’s love at the cost of their life.  In Christian art, crowns are the symbol of martyrs, those who, to quote the words of Jesus from our reading “lay down their life for their friends”, and particularly those who lay down their life for the love of God because there is no alternative which leaves them with any integrity.  Marriage, in that sense, is a kind of “white martyrdom”, an act of witness in which no blood is shed, but in which the ego of a husband or wife is laid low by the demands of self-giving love.

By their choice of reading for this celebration, the couple had set the bar for the future of their relationship high, some might think “impossibly high”. But, the closing words of Jesus in that reading remind us that it isn’t down to them, or to any of us, to be romantic heroes or heroines in our own strength.  In fact, most of love isn’t about heroism – or romance, for that matter, once the glamour and excitement of a celebration like Friday’s fades into memory.  Most of love is not about the grand gesture, but about the little deaths to selfishness and pride, the everyday exchanges, the patience, the willingness to forgive and be forgiven which come about when each partner puts the other’s good, the other’s happiness, ahead of their own.  Love is about learning who we are, and who the other is, within God’s love; and God’s love is the source and the sustainer of human love. Love is about bearing fruit, “fruit that will last”, says Jesus.  Our prayers on Friday were that the couple’s love for each other will indeed bear more and more fruit as each of them learns more fully the art of self-surrender and abides faithfully in one another’s love until their love becomes taken up wholly into the love of God.


A Church in crisis?

One of the changes identified in the British Social Attitudes survey for 2017 gave rise to such headlines as “Church in crisis as only 2% of young adults identify as C of E”.

There was, as you may imagine, a lot of hand-wringing about this, but the Revd Angela Rayner (newly ordained and serving as assistant curate in the Lynn Team Ministry in Norwich Diocese), called for a sense of proportion. ‘The Church of England’ she tweeted ‘is very rarely “in crisis”, (only when the tea runs out), but terminal decline is more of an issue. It may not be inevitable, and might be reversible if we would undertake certain steps.’

What follows is her list of twenty suggestions to halt – or reverse the decline.  Not all of them are easily applicable outside the UK, but I post them here for you to ponder.  What, among Ms Rayner’s list, is possible for us here in Genoa? What would never work because of where we are/who we are? What other possibilities would you suggest?

  1. All church buildings to be open daily from morning to dusk.
  2. Morning and Evening Prayer to be said publicly every day in every parish/benefice.
  3. Evening Prayer to be sung, if at all possible, once a week according to BCP.
  4. Mass to be said daily or at least four times per week in each Benefice (where possible).
  5. Mass to be celebrated on major feast days, not transferred to Sunday.
  6. Domestic liturgical practices to be introduced in every household (epiphany chalking, Advent calendars etc.)
  7. Abstinence from meat to be reintroduced on Fridays, and communal parish fasts to be agreed in Lent.
  8. Confession (or equivalent) to be advertised, encouraged and held weekly, not by appointment.
  9. Weekly catechism classes, and lay guilds of catechists trained by Dioceses.
  10. All parishes to go on pilgrimage once a year (locally or further afield)
  11. Spiritual direction to be given greater prominence, and more spiritual directors trained. All Christians encouraged to adopt spiritual directors.
  12. Links between non-church schools and churches to be strengthened, and schools welcomed frequently into church buildings esp on Sundays.
  13. Children to be involved in “up front” ways as much as possible in all church services e.g. choir, reading, serving.
  14. Children and youth to attend an annual festival/pilgrimage or similar to meet a wider variety of Christians.
  15. Nobody to be refused baptism, but church to appoint additional God-parents/supporters to encourage additional contact with families.
  16. Churching of women service to be updated, and mothers and fathers to be welcomed into church when children are born.
  17. Use of sacramentals to be encouraged in and out of church e.g. holy water stoops, rosaries, candles and medals.
  18. Public processions to be held a few times each year, and new businesses/classrooms/homes to be blessed frequently.
  19. Parishioners encouraged to give 5% of income to parish church.
  20. All clergy to wear clerical collars.

Ponte Morandi – a month on (14th September, 2018)

The Church of the Holy Ghost participated in the minute’s silence in memory of the victims and the “Nine Tailors” were rung on the ship’s bell of the “London Valour” immediately before the silence.  In the evening Tony Dickinson attended both the civic act of remembrance in Piazza de Ferrari and the memorial Mass in the Cathedral. 

Both the civic and the cathedral acts of remembrance for those who died in the collapse of the Ponte Morandi were “full house”, with standing-room only in San Lorenzo and the vast space of Piazza de Ferrari full of people. Young and old, men and women, teenagers and young children of all races gathered together in both venues, representatives of a city united, to show their grief and sense of loss, their solidarity with those who mourn most deeply, and their gratitude to those, vigili, police, volunteers of all kinds, who had undertaken the difficult and dangerous work of rescue and recovery. The civic remembrance began with a reading of the names of the dead, each with a short biographical sketch, to the accompaniment of the Adagio by Samuel Barber. Some were almost unbearably poignant, especially the last, of the youngest person to die. Here even the reader, who had kept control of his emotions through what must have been a horribly difficult task, almost lost it, and all the way through there was much furtive (and not-so-furtive) wiping of eyes and blowing of noses. Bishop Anselmi spoke well in the Piazza, finishing his contribution by leading the crowd in saying the Angelus, whose closing words, a plea to Mary to “Pray for us sinners, now and at the hour of our death”, were singularly appropriate. And it was good to see the vigili and others taking centre stage as they recalled their part in the tragedy. The Mass in the cathedral was solemn and dignified, and the names of the victims were again read out, this time within the framework of the Eucharistic prayer, giving a sense of thanksgiving for their lives as well as the offering of those lives to be taken up into the suffering and death of Jesus and transformed by the love and mercy of God.


On Thursday 10th May the Church marks the return of Jesus to the Father who sent him.  There will be a celebration of the Eucharist for Ascension Day at 1230, and the church will be open all day for people to drop in and pray.  This is being done as part of the global “Thy Kingdom Come” initiative, which runs from Ascension Day to Pentecost (10th-20th May). “Thy Kingdom Come” started in England a couple of years ago and is now being taken up enthusiastically (and ecumenically) in many countries. There will be morning and evening prayer at the Church of the Holy Ghost on the day as well as prayer stations and other resources.  I hope you will be able to join us.  If you would like to know more about “Thy Kingdom Come” and, particularly, about things that individuals and families can do during the ten days, please follow this link https://www.thykingdomcome.global/ to the website and then click on “Resources”. There will also, I hope, be material appearing on the “Church and Friends” FB page during the next few days, so please, if you are on Facebook, please keep an eye on that.


A new page in this church’s history:

We have Fr Tony Dickinson with us to provide an active ministry to this church and metropolitan area. A very exciting time and an important development for our congregation. Welcome!

Revd Canon Tony Dickinson

Born in Liverpool in 1948, Tony Dickinson was educated at Liverpool Collegiate School and New College, Oxford.  He worked in university administration at the University of Durham’s Institute of Education and the Open University’s Southern Regional office in Oxford before following a call to ordained ministry.   After training at Lincoln Theological College he was ordained in St Alban’s Abbey (deacon 1982: priest 1983).  Since then he has worked in parishes in Watford (1982-1986), Slough (1986-1994) and High Wycombe (1994-2018).  From 1995 to 2013 he was one of the team of Ecumenical Officers in the diocese of Oxford, serving for some years as team leader.  For the past 23 years he has also been the European Officer of the Diocese of Oxford, developing a formal partnership with the diocese of Växjö in the Church of Sweden and encouraging attendance at the German Protestant Kirchentag, which he has attended since 1985.  Since 2005 he has been an Honorary Canon of Christ Church Cathedral in Oxford.  He has been engaged in interfaith and intercultural relations for much of his ministry, with a particular focus on the encounter between Christians and Muslims, about which he has written.  He is also an experienced spiritual director.

Tony is a reasonably fluent French-speaker and can get by in German, Spanish and Italian (he is working on this!) as well as in Swedish.  He is married to Sandra, who is a health-care professional, and they have two grown-up children, Hugh and Beatrice.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Some of our locum chaplains who has served our church so generously in the past:

 

For February, including Ash Wednesday and the start of Lent, we welcome back Fr Gordon Bond SSC.

Fr GordonBy birth a Yorkshireman, I trained at Chichester Theological College, and my ministry has been spent very much south of my homeland, mostly in the Diocese of Chichester.

Before moving to the parish of St Mary East Grinstead, where I spent a large part of my priestly ministry, I was chaplain to Bishop Colin Docker, then Bishop of Horsham. I enjoyed my time working with Bishop Colin, but always saw my vocation in parish ministry.

I enjoyed being at Saint Mary’s, where, with a strong core of laity, we led a firm spiritual life in the catholic tradition of the Church of England.

Since retiring some ten years ago and battling with a few ill-health problems, I have been helping out in the parish of St Richard in Haywards Heath.

My two hobbies are Travel in Continental Europe (when I am fit and able) and I enjoy Modern Foreign Languages. I speak reasonable French and a little German. My Italian is improving in terms of nouns: verbs are next!

I count it a privilege to serve once again the spiritual community at Holy Ghost.

 

 

Fr Bernard Fray is back with us for the month of January.

 I have been in parish ministry for some twenty years. Having previously been in teaching at King Edward VI School Lichfield and then deputy head at an independent school in Hampshire, I moved back north to take on the role of Head at a school near Scarborough .
I was ordained in York Minster and still continue to serve in the York Diocese.   Since retiring from full time ministry, I have enjoyed my several visits to Genoa, both in the heat of summer and the cold of winter. I have had two Christmases here. I have also served  at St. Moritz in Switzerland on three winter seasons, and in addition I serve as chaplain on the Saga cruise liners.     I love travelling, modern languages and performing music (when I can).

 

 

 

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We welcome for the first time Bishop David Farrer, and his wife Helen, to be wish us for most of November then Advent and Christmas.

Bishop David Farrer was born in England but moved to Australia as a child. He trained as a horticulturist in the Dandenong Ranges and at Burnley Horticultural College, Melbourne before studying for the ordained ministry in Adelaide. He was ordained priest in 1969 and a few years later returned to Melbourne where he served in the parishes of Brunswick and Eastern Hill, was Chaplain to Parliament of Victoria, a Canon of St Paul’s Cathedral and also Archdeacon of Melbourne. His commitment to community work in Australia earned him the title of Citizen of the Year in Brunswick in 1983 “for work with the unemployed and homeless”.

He was consecrated bishop in 1998 and was Bishop of Wangaratta from 1998 to 2008, during which time he helped establish four low-fee Anglican schools.  His vision for these schools was that they should be low-fee Anglican Schools for the growing populations of the Diocese, to work closely with the local parishes and to meet the educational social and spiritual needs of the children who attended. From their very beginnings he and the other founders have overseen amazing growth of what was obviously a very much wanted and needed educational option.

In 2008 Bishop David returned to England to become Vicar of the Parish of Arundel in West Sussex: he also served as an Assistant Bishop in the Diocese of Chichester. Since then he has done an eighteen-month locum in the Parish of All Saints East St Kilda in Melbourne and a shorter locum at the nearby St James’ Parish.

Bishop David and Helen have two sons and five grandchildren in Australia.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

For the month of October and the first part of November we welcome the return of Fr Peter Blackburn, long-time locum chaplain with this church, he is now based in London.

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We welcome for the first time to our church Fr Richard Gowty who sends this message to us all:

Greetings to you all from Australia.

I am looking forward to being your Chaplain for the month of September.

It will be the third time I have served in Italy, having been a locum Chaplain on previous occasions in Lake Como and Taormina.

My wife Maggie and I live on Queensland’s Sunshine Coast with our dog Barney where I am an Archdeacon and in charge of the parish of Palmwoods. Maggie is a retired teacher, and together we enjoy the many blessings of life in a wonderful country, enjoying good health and surrounded by family and friends.

We have three married daughters, Anna, Kate and Sophie and seven grandchildren, all of whom live in reasonably close proximity to us.

We love to travel, especially in Europe, with Italy and the Italian people close to our hearts. We have lived in a number of overseas places where I have worked as a priest, including London and the USA, but we are pleased to call Australia home.

Besides our love for the Anglican church, we have many interests. Obviously we both enjoy travel and meeting new friends, and look forward to doing so amongst you in September.

Maggie manages the Parish Op shop in Palmwoods and enjoys reading, keeping up with family and friends, cooking and gardening; I am a keen golfer as well as an unashamed lover of Italian food and culture, and this increases every time we have the privilege of visiting your country. Together we are proud grandparents to Lily, Emma, Harry, George, Daisy, Bell and Phoebe.

Maggie and I will shortly leave Australia to be with you in Genoa. We very much look forward to this posting and pray that my ministry among you will be a blessing to both you and us.

With warm regards

Archdeacon Richard and Maggie Gowty

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We welcome back to our church, after quite some time (!), for the last Sunday in July and the whole month of August Fr. Michael Bullock.

I was last in Genova in 2000, having spent eighteen months as Chaplain of Liguria. There will be one or two people I remember from those days, and I look forward to meeting them again and also getting to know new faces. Since leaving Liguria I was Chaplain at Lisbon (Portugal) for a number of years before retiring to England in 2012. I have lived in Spalding in the east of England since then, interspersed with periods of locum duty in the Diocese in Europe in various countries all of which
have interested and stimulated me. History and languages and the people who speak them have always been a joy. I am writing this from Norfolk (England) where I am attending the annual retreat and chapter meeting of the Oratory of the Good Shepherd (OGS) a religious society of celibate priests and laymen to which I have belonged since 1993.
After leaving Genova in September I hope to take up the ministry of Chaplain of Bonn and Cologne (Germany) in November.
Michael Bullock OGS

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For June and most of July we were happy to have Fr Bernard Fray back with us.

 I have been in parish ministry for some twenty years. Having previously been in teaching at King Edward VI School Lichfield and then deputy head at an independent school in Hampshire, I moved back north to take on the role of Head at a school near Scarborough .
I was ordained in York Minster and still continue to serve in the York Diocese.   Since retiring from full time ministry, I have enjoyed my several visits to Genoa, both in the heat of summer and the cold of winter. I have had two Christmases here. I have also served  at St. Moritz in Switzerland on three winter seasons, and in addition I serve as chaplain on the Saga cruise liners.     I love travelling, modern languages and performing music (when I can).

 

 

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We welcome back to our church for the month of May Rev. Douglas Greenaway

The Rev. Douglas Andrew Greenaway was Ordained to the Holy Order of Priests in the Anglican/Episcopal Diocese of Washington and completed his Master of Divinity at Wesley Theological Seminary, in Washington, DC. He currently serves as Priest Associate at St. Paul’s Rock Creek Parish. Prior ministries include serving as Assistant Rector at St. Alban’s Parish, Washington, DC, as Clergy Chaplain for Episcopal Students at American University, and as on-call Chaplain at Washington Hospital Center.

Since 1985, Fr. Greenaway has served as an advocate and government affairs specialist.  As President & CEO of the NATIONAL WIC ASSOCIATION, NWA, since 1990, Douglas is responsible for directing the Association as well as representing the interests of its members – the 50 States, 40 Indian Nations, and Trust Territories, 2200 local agencies, and 10,000 clinics who operate the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children as well as the nearly 9 million mothers and young children who participate in WIC – before Congress, the US Department of Agriculture, other Federal agencies and the White House.  His ministry with NWA has been recognized by the Presiding Bishop of the Episcopal Church, USA.

A Master’s graduate of The Catholic University of America’s School of Architecture in Washington, DC, Douglas practiced his profession as an Architect for eight years in Los Angeles, India, Washington, DC, and Germany before returning to an earlier love, public policy!

In 1974, after graduating in Political Science/Sociology from Carleton University in Ottawa, Canada, Douglas began work with the Research Office of the Official Opposition in Canadian Parliament, writing speeches and debate notes for the Leader of the Official Opposition and Opposition Members of Parliament.

A resident of Washington, DC, Douglas was born in Belleville, Ontario, Canada. He is the proud father of Vishal Sean and a new grandson Kavi Vishal. Both father and son are avid, dedicated skiers.

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For Easter and our service of Confirmation we welcomed back Fr Gordon Bond SSC.

Fr GordonBy birth a Yorkshireman, I trained at Chichester Theological College, and my ministry has been spent very much south of my homeland, mostly in the Diocese of Chichester.

Before moving to the parish of St Mary East Grinstead, where I spent a large part of my priestly ministry, I was chaplain to Bishop Colin Docker, then Bishop of Horsham. I enjoyed my time working with Bishop Colin, but always saw my vocation in parish ministry.

I enjoyed being at Saint Mary’s, where, with a strong core of laity, we led a firm spiritual life in the catholic tradition of the Church of England.

Since retiring some ten years ago and battling with a few ill-health problems, I have been helping out in the parish of St Richard in Haywards Heath.

My two hobbies are Travel in Continental Europe (when I am fit and able) and I enjoy Modern Foreign Languages. I speak reasonable French and a little German. My Italian is improving in terms of nouns: verbs are next!

I count it a privilege to have served the spiritual community at Holy Ghost on several occasions – twice now to celebrate together the joy of the Resurrection.

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Priests at the Church of the Holy Ghost Genova 2016-2017

Here are the names of the priests coming to serve this church over the next months. We thank them for their dedication and witness.

2016

  • December   –   Peter Cavanagh

2017

  • January 1   –    Peter Cavanagh
  • January      –    Clifford Owen
  • February    –    Ed Hanson
  • March         –    Elizabeth Bussmann
  • April            –    Gordon Bond
  • May             –    Douglas Greenaway
  • June            –    Bernard Fray
  • July             –    Bernard Fray
  • August        –    Michael Bullock
  • September –    Richard Gowty
  • October      –    Peter Blackburn
  • November –    Douglas Greenaway
  • December. –   Michael Bullock

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For the month of March we have been privileged to welcome back Rev.d Elizabeth Bussmann-Morton. She is also our Environment Officer for the Anglican Diocese in Europe.

I have lived in Switzerland since 1971 and trained originally as a Deacon in the Swiss Church. However, in 2000 my husband Edi, and I returned to England where I trained as a Church Army Evangelist in Sheffield. We had thought we would stay for two or three years but it became 14! In 2014 we returned to Switzerland to enjoy our grandchildren while they are still relatively young. When we left in 2000 we had 1, now there are 10!

In England I was rector of two parishes in Surrey, a ministry I really loved. Now I help twice a month at St Peter’s in Chateau d’Oex and am also the Environmental Officer for the Diocese in Europe. I have also discovered the privilege of being a locum minister. This is my first time outside of Switzerland where I have been a seasonal minister for ICS in places such as Zermatt, Interlaken and Wengen. Our Golden Retriever, Monty, is also here in Genova and he LOVES it! Never had so many pats and kisses, not to mention all the dogs everywhere we go! Life will be very boring back home…..

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For February 2017 Holy Ghost Anglican Church has welcomed back Father Ed Hanson.

Ed Hanson

The Rev. Edward W. Hanson lives in Twickenham, England (within shouting distant of the RFU stadium, although sadly not a fan himself).  Originally from Boston, Massachusetts, Ed worked as an academic historian before training for ordination initially at the Episcopal Divinity School, Cambridge, Mass., and then at Ripon College Cuddesdon, Oxford.  He was ordained at Lincoln Cathedral and served a curacy in Lincoln City before moving to an incumbency in the Diocese of Chelmsford.  For ten years he was rector of three village parishes in the south of Essex and served as Rural Dean before taking a (slightly) early retirement in 2014.  Since then, Ed has been busy with locum work both in the West London area and most recently with the Diocese in Europe.  When one retires as a Rector, one does not retire as a priest.  In fact, it usually means that one can own one’s priesthood more fully when not weighed down with administration and meetings.  It has also allowed more time for a return to historical research and writing (early American history, genealogy, and a current project in Italian history), as well as travel through much of Europe which he has still not visited.

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January 2017 – Fr Clifford Owen

Clifford and Avis Owen

Clifford retired from the Chaplaincy in Ostend and Bruges Belgium in October 2012 so is now into his fifth year of retirement. Apart from one or two short locums a year he has been quite busy in Huntingdon Deanery where he took six weddings last summer. Apart from retirement ministry Clifford has tried to keep up the practical interests that he knows cannot last for more than a few years. He works a day each week on the Nene Valley Steam Railway as a volunteer in the workshop. Twice a year he helps on archaeological digs in Cambridgeshire and has recently joined Huntingdon Male Voice Choir.
Avis continues to work as a volunteer research assistant in Huntingdonshire County Record Office and has taken up learning Latin to understand the medieval parish registers. She continues her sewing interest and has made three recent outstanding bed quilts.
Increasingly time is being taken up with assisting elderly relations as well as giving back to our four children and grandchildren some of the time they have missed from us over the ten years we have worked in the Diocese in Europe before retirement.

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Advent and Christmas – We are very grateful to Fr Peter Cavanagh for stepping in and joining us mid-December till the New Year.

fr-peter-cavanagh

Peter Cavanagh was ordained in 1973 in the Diocese of Liverpool and after serving a curacy was appointed Vicar of St Columba’s Church, Anfield in 1979.  St Columba’s is an Art Deco church building and during his time there a restoration of this wonderful church was undertaken.

In 1994 the Parish Hall was burnt down (on November 5th!) and a new Parish Centre was added to the church building.  In 1997 Peter was appointed  Vicar of Lancaster and stayed there until retirement in 2010.  Throughout his ministry Peter has served on various committees connected with the care and preservation of church buildings, and now helps find new uses for churches now surplus to requirement.
He enjoys reading, cooking, music (especially opera) and is an avid reader.

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For November 2016 we welcome the return of Fr John Smith:

Canon John Smith

Canon John Smith

I am a retired Anglican priest and diocesan educationalist, living in Nottinghamshire, but most recently in paid employment in Kent, who has been here three of four times previously. Proof of my marriage is in the photo, and I am much occupied by travelling in Italy and the USA, where our son has lived and worked since 2000, and our only grandchildren are. I love playing chess, reading novels and history, doing the Guardian crossword, looking at art, the ballet, listening to music, speaking French, and leading Church of England worship.

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For October 2016 we welcome Fr John Bennett, for the first time, to our church.

IMG_0700John and Rita Bennett live in the Yorkshire Dales, in the UK. Rita is a retired teacher. John is a retired Anglican priest who has served in North Yorkshire, both as a Methodist superintendent and an Anglican priest and now works in the chaplaincy team in Ripon Cathedral. They have organised a number of ecumenical pilgrimages in both Rome and Assisi and currently John is the Yorkshire representative, in support of the Anglican Centre in Rome.  He is also a member of the Anglican Franciscan third order. They have served overseas in the Church of Bangladesh and John is a trustee of Christians Aware, an international and ecumenical movement aiming to develop multi-cultural understanding.   They have a love of Italy, history, the arts and the countryside.

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For the month of September we welcomed the return of Fr Peter Blackburn.

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For the month of July we welcome the return of Fr David Emmott.

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For the month of June we welcome the return of Fr Lawson Nagel.

Fr Lawson

It’s great to be back in Genoa after a five-year gap! My wife Mary and I lead busy lives – I am the Vicar of Aldwick in the Diocese of Chichester and Mary is the Secretary of the Catholic Group in General Synod – but coming to Genoa allows us to have a ‘working holiday’ and meet up with friends old and new. Back in 2011 we had our two younger children Tim and Polly with us; both are now married and Polly and her husband Gareth are expecting their second child in September. Our elder son Tom works in London and rings bells in various churches, and our elder daughter Lucy is a deacon in Bristol. Over the years I have been able to point several priests from the Catholic tradition towards Genoa, and it’s good that Mary and I have been able to come this year ourselves . There’s such a warm welcome here for us, and for you too – come and see!

Fr Lawson

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For Easter we welcome back Fr Gordon Bond SSC.

Fr GordonBy birth a Yorkshireman, I trained at Chichester Theological College, and my ministry has been spent very much south of my homeland, mostly in the Diocese of Chichester.

Before moving to the parish of St Mary East Grinstead, where I spent a large part of my priestly ministry, I was chaplain to Bishop Colin Docker, then Bishop of Horsham. I enjoyed my time working with Bishop Colin, but always saw my vocation in parish ministry.

I enjoyed being at Saint Mary’s, where, with a strong core of laity, we led a firm spiritual life in the catholic tradition of the Church of England.

Since retiring some ten years ago and battling with a few ill-health problems, I have been helping out in the parish of St Richard in Haywards Heath.

My two hobbies are Travel in Continental Europe (when I am fit and able) and I enjoy Modern Foreign Languages. I speak reasonable French and a little German. My Italian is improving in terms of nouns: verbs are next!

I count it a privilege to have served the spiritual community at Holy Ghost on several occasions – twice now to celebrate together the joy of the Resurrection.

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For March 2016 we welcomed Fr John Bennett, for the first time, to our church.

IMG_0700John and Rita Bennett live in the Yorkshire Dales, in the UK. Rita is a retired teacher. John is a retired Anglican priest who has served in North Yorkshire, both as a Methodist superintendent and an Anglican priest and now works in the chaplaincy team in Ripon Cathedral. They have organised a number of ecumenical pilgrimages in both Rome and Assisi and currently John is the Yorkshire representative, in support of the Anglican Centre in Rome.  He is also a member of the Anglican Franciscan third order. They have served overseas in the Church of Bangladesh and John is a trustee of Christians Aware, an international and ecumenical movement aiming to develop multi-cultural understanding.   They have a love of Italy, history, the arts and the countryside.

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Sunday March 20th: Palm Sunday Address

Sunday March 13th:   Passion Sunday Address and today’s Baptism

Sunday March 6th:       A Message for Mothering Sunday from Revd John

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Here are some of the profiles of chaplains who come to serve the International Anglican Church in Genova

For January 2017 we will welcome back Father Clifford Owen owen picture

Holy Ghost Anglican Church welcomes Rev. Dr. Clifford Owen and his wife, Avis, who have joined us from England. Prior to becoming a priest, Fr.Clifford served in the Royal Navy for 10 years as an Engineering Officer. His tours of duty took him to the Far East, Persian Gulf, Mediterranean and the Baltic.

Fr. Clifford was ordained priest in 1974 in the Dioceseof St. Edmundsbury and Ipswich. In 1976 he moved to the Guildford Diocese, where he worked in
a new housing area near Bordon army camp and was successful in building an ecumenical church with the Methodists and URCs. It was here also that
he became involved in the healing ministry. Then in 1989, he moved to rural ministry in the Teme Valley of Worcestershire where he was also the Diocesan Ecumenical Officer.
In 2002 Fr. Clifford served as chaplain at Holy Trinity parish on the Greek island of Corfu where he was involved in helping to plant new congregations on Corfu, and also on the islands of Paxos and Lefkada.
In 2008 Fr. Clifford moved to the English speaking churches of Brugge and Oostende in Belgium. He officially retired from there in 2012. He now lives in the Diocese of Ely in the UK and keeps busy doing supply work at different churches, as a Day Chaplain at the Ely Cathedral and as a trustee of the Acorn and Whitehill Chase trusts.
In 2013 Fr. Clifford did an extended stint as locum chaplain at St. Luke’s in Fontainebleau, France.
In his retirement, Fr. Clifford now works as a volunteer on the Nene Valley Railway, Peterborough, one of the UK’s 113 steam locomotive heritage lines, where he is able to lend some of his engineering experience from back in the “old days.”
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